Ideologically, I couldn’t be more opposed to an Obama/Biden administration.

Yet…

As an American, I couldn’t be more proud.

America is a great country. This is an amazing moment in our history and I’m going to enjoy it and bless God for it.

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14 thoughts on “

  1. Totally. I keep saying that I’m glad I didn’t vote for him, but I’m not exactly disappointed he won and I’m not sure what to do with that.I let my older girls stay up tonight to see him officially called in as president. This is history, after all. And it is different. The abortion thing still saddens me. So I’ve told my kids we need to be praying God will change Obama’s heart. It could happen, I guess.

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  2. Totally off topic, but I just wanted to say that although I wasn’t able to keep up with the reading of Future Grace – I am thoroughly enjoying reading it and am being challenged by it. I just finished chapter (only!) and I love how he unpacked that passage in Romans 8.

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  3. I could not disagree more. Our nation has chosen a leader who:1. Received a 100% approval rating from Planned Parenthood. 2. A man who is the darling of the likes of Ahmadinejad, Chavez, Castro and Hamas. 3. A man who voted for infanticide and against a ban on same-sex marriage. 4. A man who sat for 20 years under a pastor who openly and unashamedly embraces the teachings of James Cone. Who is James Cone? A liberal theologian who wrote the book “A Black Theology of Liberation”. Mr. Cone wrote, “Black theology refuses to accept a God who is not identified totally with the goals of the black community. If God is not for us and against white people, then He is a murderer, and we had better kill Him.”Proud? Hardly.

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  4. Jules, I wrote that I disagree with his ideology. I am merely recognizing the historical significance of this election.

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  5. Leslie, honestly, I really could be much, much more proud of this country. Historically significant to elect our first black president? Yes. Absolutely. To be proud of it? No. I am deeply humbled before God and pray for His mercy as this man who is the most rabidly pro-abort fellow in DC is now in charge.

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  6. Leslie,The color of Obama’s skin really has absolutely nothing to do with my feelings against him. Will I pray for him? Absolutely! Can I be proud of him as our president? Absolutely NOT! He scares me to death! I completely agree with “rabbit’s” comment. He by his own admission plans to undo everything the prolife movement has worked so hard to accomplish!Every time I feel the baby, the precious life God has blessed me and my family with, move inside of me I think of all the little lives that America has just taken the protection away from by electing Barack Obama!Historical? Yes! Proud? NO!!!!!

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  7. I’ve been thinking through and processing some things. I think what I agree with is that I am glad we are finally coming to a place in our country where race may finally become a non-issue. I hope so. But, at the same time, I am concerned about this particular election because I am convinced that the issues played very little part in many people’s choice for president – race and personality did. I can’t tell you how many people I heard say that McCain was boring to listen to and Obama was exciting, with no discussion of the substance of what either candidate had to say. The decision, I fear, was made on superficial things, not on the real issues. In fact, I bet a lot of people who voted probably couldn’t even tell us what the fundamental differences are between McCain and Obama. And that’s frightening.So, the reason I agree with your post is that I am glad for the historic significance, but sad that I still think we have a very long way to go toward a society where race is just not a factor in our decision making. Does that make sense?I think all the pundits who are waxing eloquent about what the voters were saying with this election are getting it wrong. I don’t think a lot of the votes were made on the fundamental issues but on who they think or hope Obama is (do we really know??), what they think he will do for them, and dislike of George Bush. But the deeper issues? What issues? That’s what I fear.May we commit to pray for our leaders and for our country – something I am very convicted that I have not been faithful to do often enough.

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  8. Proud would have been getting there without prejudice. 95% of black men voted for Obama. Not the man, not ideals, not principles. They voted for a color. That is prejudice.

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  9. I think if readers have followed your blog AT. ALL. then they know two things:You love Jesus &You did not want Obama to be president.The compromise is not worth the accomplishment. For sure. No question. But it happened … and that is still an accomplishment. I getcha.

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  10. I agree with Kim…I know your heart and know that you didn’t want Obama to be president. I think Dr. Albert Mohler summed it up best in his blog post on the day following the election…which is found here:http://www.albertmohler.com/blog_read.php?id=2715(sorry I don’t know how to properly link it)We have a responsibility as Christian American. We can’t just sit back and bemoan what God has allowed (and He DID allow it, or it wouldn’t have happened). It’s time to step up and pray for our nation like never before.

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