Virtuals and Webcam Caches


The other day, I blogged about different types of caches. I mentioned traditional, multi, mystery, earth, letterbox, and CITO. There are two types of caches that are no longer allowed. The ones that currently exist in the geocaching.com system are grandfathered in; GC will not publish new ones. Because these particular types are being archived and, thus, dwindling in number every year, most cachers will not pass up an opportunity to visit and log them. I’m referring to virtual caches and webcam caches.

virtual_72A virtual cache is one where the cacher goes to the listed coordinates and answers a question, takes a picture of something specific, or completes a task of some sort. There isn’t a container to find or paper to sign. If we go find a virtual cache, it means we’re about to visit a really interesting place or historic landmark OR experience something cool. One of my favorite virtuals is called, “Grant’s Debacle,” just outside of Vicksburg, MS. For the life of me, I could not understand what General Grant was trying to do until I stood at the site and saw the attempted canal for myself.

webcam_72 A webcam cache is one at which a cacher must go to the listed coordinates and stand in front of a webcam. There isn’t a container to find or a log to sign. But there is a task involved. The cacher must either, a) have a friend who will sit in front of a computer and watch the webcam for the moment when she is in the frame AND take a screenshot of her on the webcam, or b) use her smartphone to view the webcam and take a screenshot of herself once she’s in frame. Most of the time, the webcams are down. The good thing is that most of the cache owners will accept a regular photo. I’ve only logged a couple of webcam caches, but all were fun. We did a couple on Beale Street in Memphis, TN. We stood on the street corner while the traffic camera was supposed to take our picture. Unfortunately, the traffic cameras were all down, so we just took a group selfie. Another time, we visited a tower in Auburn, AL. Again, that camera wasn’t operating. At a webcam on the campus of Mississippi State University, we stood outside one of the buildings around the quad and had to phoon. We looked silly, but it was fun.

phooning
Working on a Busy Day Challenge in Mississippi, July 2014. That’s Ben, Noah, Abbey, Karl, me, Hannah, and Aunt Terry PHOONING. Uncle Richard took the picture.
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